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Motion Sickness: Felt But Not Seen

How to Overcome Motion Sickness

A big question we get on our snorkel boats is “will we get sea sick?”   I wish I could give them a definite answer, but every person is different making the answer, there’s always a chance?  If you’ve gotten sick on previous boat trips, in planes/cars, or feel that your susceptible to it, take preventive measures.  Better to take it and not need it, then to not take it and be miserable!  We do have a ginger drink on board that helps most of our uneasy passengers settle their stomachs, and most people feel instantly better when they jump in the water.  The great thing is that most people are able to get over it!  We had a little guy named Luke on the Four Winds II on Monday that was not feeling very well on the way out to Molokini. I mean REALLY not well!  Once we pulled in to the crater we got him to jump in the ocean for a bit of snorkeling.   It took some encouraging to put his face in the water and some adjustments to keep him out there, but he was hooked in no time!  Before the end of the day he was sliding and doing some canon balls off of the side, having the time of his life!  I spotted him watching the video presented on the trip back, pointing out all the fish he saw and laughing at the sight of himself in the water.  Then to top off his trip he helped me read of the raffle ticket numbers!  Needless to say he was ecstatic about the trip and had totally forgotten about the trip out there!

So where does the feeling of nausea and sickness come from?  It’s a pair of tiny organs located within the inner ears that gets more stimulation then it’s used to, which affects everyone in a different way.  There are some people that this hits every time they are “off balance”.  Then their are some people that get it just from certain movements like side to side.  The key is to try to prevent it.  There are many over the counter drugs you can take prior to your trip (i.e. Bo-nine & Dramamine), just make sure it’s non-drowsy!  Sea bands work for some people.  They are straps that go around the wrist that hit a pressure point affiliated with balance.  The natural remedy is ginger, whether it’s ginger pills, ginger candy, or our version of a ginger drink.  Then there are the basics of avoiding it.  Stay on the lower back deck, facing the direction the boat is going.  Keep your eyes on the horizon or a land mass.  Of course staying hydrated with cold water or sprite is always a good idea when your out on a boat in the hot sun!

In the end, attitude is everything.  We find that most people that feel seasick can overcome it or still have an enjoyable time if they make the best of the situation.  Do what makes you feel better, whether it’s staying in the water, having a icy cold beverage, or put something cold on your neck.  You never know,  hopefully bounce back just like little Luke!

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